Newcomers to Canada sometimes require supports to assist with adapting to their new home and circumstances. Relocating to a new country poses many challenges, even for the most resilient. Such change can tap ones agency. Stresses associated with language, cultural differences, different values around gender roles and parenting, finding employment, as well as having to establish one’s self in a new community and develop new supports, can be complex, frustrating and stressful. For those who have fled persecution from war torn countries or areas that oppress particular minority groups, be it based on religion, gender, ethnicity or other differences, sometimes come to Canada traumatized by their experiences. Such trauma can drain one’s capacity to cope with the many changes associated with relocating to Canada and can manifest in many ways. Marital and familial conflict, parenting, addiction, depression and anxiety, are examples of problems that can manifest as a result of such trauma.

Scott has considerable experience with these areas, both personally and professionally. Being in a cross-cultural marriage and working in other countries has necessitated awareness of cross-cultural issues. Scott’s professional experience has included working in both the delivery of intercultural services as well as collaboratively with ethno-cultural organizations in the development and delivery of culturally competent services. Scott also possesses “Train the Trainer Certification” in Culturally Sensitive Practice through the Centre for Race and Culture and has assisted many families with ‘parenting in two cultures’.

Providing supports to individuals, families and organizations is an area of social work that is close to Scott’s heart and he is pleased to continue providing services and best practices in this area.

Connect for a free 15 minute exploratory conversation.